IL VERBO TO GET E GLI IDIOMI CHE OCCORRE RICORDARE

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Il verbo to get è uno dei più difficili verbi da ricordare e da utilizzare ma con gli esercizi tutto è possibile

PHRASAL VERBS WITH GET

GET ABOUT
(intransitive) to go from place to placeMary gets about quite well without a car.
GET ACROSS
(separable) to communicate clearly or convincinglyNo matter how hard I tried I couldn’t get the message across to her that I cared.
GET ACROSS
(intransitive) to be convincing or clearMax has trouble getting across to members of the opposite sex.
GET AHEAD
(intransitive) to make progress in becoming successfulMax compliments his boss constantly in order to het ahead.
GET ALONG
(intransitive) to advance (especially in years)George is really getting along in years. Is he going to retire soon?
GET ALONG
(intransitive) have a congenial relationship with someoneJane and John get along quite well, but Mary and Max can’t even stand to be in the same room.
GET ALONG
(intransitive) to manage or fare reasonablyMax is able to get along each day on just 2 slices of bread and a glass of water.
GET AROUND
(inseparable) to evade, circumventGeorge hired many lawyers to help him find ways to get around various laws.
GET AROUND
(intransitive) to go from place to placeSince my car broke down, I’ have been getting around by bicycle.
GET AROUND
(intransitive) to become known, circulateWord got around that Mary was pregnant.
GET AT
(inseparable) to access or reachCould you please scratch my back? I have this itch that I just can’t quite get at.
GET AT
(intransitive) to hint, suggest, convey, or try to make understandableI think I know what you are getting at, but I’m not certain.
GET AWAY
(intransitive) to escapeMax had a dream that a very fat woman was attacking him and he couldn’t get away.
GET BACK
(intransitive) to returnMax got back late from the soccer match.
GET BACK
(separable) to have something returnedWhen Mary called her engagement with Max off, Max tried to get the ring back.
GET BY
(intransitive) to succeed with minimum effort and minimum achievementSince George was a student, he has made a habit of just getting by.
GET BY
(intransitive) to survive or manageWe were able to get by on just a few dollars per week.
GET BY
(inseparable) to proceed unnoticed, ignored, or without being criticized, or punishedThe tainted meat got by the inspectors.
GET DOWN
(intransitive) to descend or lowerMax got down on his knees and prayed.
GET DOWN
(intransitive) give one’s consideration or attention (used with to)Now that we’ve finished lunch, I am ready to get down to business.
GET DOWN
(separable) to depress, exhaust or discourageTalking about politics really gets me down.
GET DOWN
(separable) to put in writingDid you get everything I said down?
GET IN
(intransitive) to arriveWhen did you get in from Paris?
GET INTO
(inseparable) to be involved withIf you get into the wrong crowd, you are likely to get into a lot of trouble.
GET OFF
(inseparable) to dismountMax got off his bicycle to tie his shoe
GET OFF
(intransitive) to receive a lesser punishment than what might be expectedMary got off with only two years in prison for the attempted murder of Max.
GET OFF
(intransitive) to receive extreme pleasureMax gets off on burning ants with his magnifying glass.
GET OFF
(separable) to give great pleasureBurning ants gets Max off.
GET OUT
(intransitive) to become knownThe news about Mary got out very quickly.
GET OUT
(intransitive) to escape or leaveSam wouldn’t stop talking so we asked him to get out.
GET OUT
(separable) cause to escape or leavePlease get that cat out of here.
GET OVER
(inseparable) to overcome, recover fromMax finally got over the flu.
GET THROUGH
(inseparable) to finish something completely; to arrive at the end of somethingIt took me almost two weeks to get through that book.
GET TO
(inseparable) to annoyThat buzzing sound really gets to me.
GET TO
(inseparable) to arrive at, to progress toI can’t wait to get to school.
GET TOGETHER
(intransitive) to meetLet’s get together tomorrow night.
GET UP
(intransitive) to rise to one’s feet or arise from bed; to climbMary gets up at sunrise to go jogging every morning.
GET UP
(separable) to cause to riseMary got Max up early this morning so that he could make her breakfast.
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